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Glimpses of Lynn Flewelling

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It’s been a while since we've done anything writing related, so my treat today is to bring you a short interview with fantasy/spec fiction author Lynn Flewelling. Lynn has an LJ presence (otterdance ) for those of you who don’t know, and I suspect that if you have any burning questions you’d like to ask in the comment section, she’d be happy to reply. Likewise if you have any questions for me or just want to discuss writing fantasy and spec fiction in general. The discussions the comments generate are always one of the best parts of LiveJournal. 

So…let’s get to it. 

 

JL - Lynn, I hate writing intros, my own or anyone else’s so, if you wouldn’t mind telling the at-home viewers a little about yourself. (I can’t imagine most of my readers aren’t familiar with you, but…) 

LF - Thanks for having me. I hate writing intros, too, especially my own, but here we go. I'm Lynn Flewelling, author of The Nightrunner Series, The Tamir Triad, and most recently, a book of Nightrunner short fiction called Glimpses. I grew up in northern Maine (no lobsters) in the 60s and 70s, and did a lot of outdoorsy stuff with my family, including hunting, which is probably where Alec came from. I went to a small liberal arts university, thinking I was going to be an English teacher, hated student teaching, and went on to a brilliant career as—well, actually I had a long string of rent-paying jobs, including house painter, property manager, freelance journalist, copy writer, and probably the most useful to me as an aspiring fantasy writer—necropsy technician. (Helping with farm animal autopsies. Ask me about cleaning up blood with a shovel or falling down in a truckload of dead cats and dogs. Go on, I dare you.) And I wrote. 

Ultimately I got my wish and published my first novel, Luck in the Shadows, with Bantam Spectra in 1996. Since then I've published four more books in that series, with number six, Casket of Souls, coming out next fall. I've also written a related trilogy, with a few short stories here and there, and of course, Glimpses. When I'm not writing I hang out with my man and my grown sons when they're around, knit, adopt homeless animals, play games with friends, walk, review teas Teaviews.com, edit Master's papers for the University of Redlands, take the occasional vacation, and read. Not very exciting, I know, but that's why I write fantasy. 

JL - Not counting fairytales and Peter Rabbit, do you remember the first fantasy novel you ever read? What impact did it make on you? 

FL - The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet by Eleanor Cameron. I was sort of a weird kid. The substantial childrens section of our public library was divided by topic. I'd start at one end of a section, say, "Dogs" or "Mystery" and read my way to the end. Mushroom Planet must have been at the beginning of the SF section. It was the story of two boys who build a spaceship and travel to a small planet where little green people are dying of a sulfur deficiency. Luckily our heroes brought their mascot hen with them, which solved the problem. Deus ex poultry. Being quite young, I was very impressed and must have read more on that shelf, but the next one I really remember was Andre Norton's Moon of Three Rings. From there I went on to read a lot of SF and some fantasy. Like many epic fantasy writers of my ancient generation, I was deeply scarred by J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. But I also imprinted especially on the Sherlock Holmes series and Ray Bradbury. Which takes us to . . . 

JL - What made you choose to write fantasy? What do you think fantasy offers as a genre that is unique? 

FL - Fantasy chose me. In high school and college I was trying to be a combination of Stephen King, H.P. Lovecraft, Arthur C. Clarke, and Bradbury, and not very successfully. Then in the early 80s, this roguish fellow named Seregil showed up in my brain, demanding a world to play in. It needed to be a fantasy world, and there I was. 

Fantasy is a fun place to work because while there are tropes, there is also a lot of freedom. You can sculpt everything from character to entire worlds to suit yourself. To me it's like a big fat scrapbook where I can paste in bits and pieces of my experience and imagination and then blur the edges to fit. Seregil was intended to be a fantasy medieval Sherlock Holmes, but he's got a lot of Odysseus, the Scarlet Pimpernel, Scaramouch, with perhaps a soupcon of Bugs Bunny in him. And, tangentially, he's gay. I have endless fun with him and his partner, Alec, and their friends. 

JL - Describe your typical work day 

FL - I recently read about yours in Man, Oh Man and was demoralized for several days. You're insanely disciplined. And productive. 

Sometimes I spend the morning in my bathrobe, drinking coffee and taking care of online matters, fan mail, answering interview questions, business, and the like, or edit papers for the university. Sometimes if I'm really being good I get up early and do my meditation and take my walk, and then take care of the other things. I do all the non book writing business I can, then I'm ready to settle down and work after lunch. I write until five or six, five days a week. If I take a week day off, I write on Saturday or Sunday. At the beginning of a project 1000 words is a good day. As I get the middle figured out and move on toward the end I can pull 3000 or 4000 here and there if the old brain is firing on all cylinders. 

JL - You get a lot of critical praise for your world-building. How much making-it-up-as- you-go do you do? 

FL - Thanks! I do a lot of research. I read about history and cultures, anthropology, food, language, religion, and so on. I go to museums and travel. I take notes in movies. I listen to music. I have life experiences and pay attention. I don' t know how often I've seen something somewhere and thought "Hey, I can use that!" It all goes into the Great Cosmic Compost Heap of the sub brain and the most surprising things bubble up. World building is part of that, a pastiche of many elements I've stoked up on. 

JL - That leads me to the ever popular question of outlining. Are you an innie or an outie? 

FL - Are you outying me, Mr. Lanyon? Seriously, though, I've tried to be an outliner, but it doesn't come naturally. I can outline small stretches, but mostly I know where I want to go, what most of the major events need to be, and then see what happens along the way. At the beginning of every project I buy a notebook—a nice one that appeals to me and seems to fit the project (my first one was a spiral bound Mead because I was poor; Casket of Souls is in black leather) In it I write down all my thoughts and plans, character sketches, lists of things to accomplish. I guess that's my way of outlining. 

I'm what my writer friends call an organic writer. One thing leads logically to another. I've done my best writing sitting down to write one thing and coming up with something completely different and unforeseen. If I try to pin everything down before I start it kills the idea. Writing for me is like playing music by ear; there's a natural progression to sentences, paragraphs, chapters, and books. They have high notes and low and you need to be able to riff and scat with the tempo. 

JL - How has the publishing industry changed since you first started out? 

FL - It's changed a lot. The major imprints are eating each other left and right, making less markets to sell to. My publisher, Bantam Spectra, just became Random House's Spectra imprint. The publishing houses are owned with few exceptions by large, non literary corporations that have their eye on the bottom line. They seem to expect nothing but best sellers. The editors still care about books, passionately, but they're under a lot of pressure. Publishing house staff are being cut, and authors, too. I know a number whose names you'd probably recognize who aren't getting their options renewed, or being told to come up with something new under a new name. I'm in the middle of a two book contract now with Spectra, but I'm not taking anything for granted when it's over. The conventions are smaller, and the lavish publisher's parties are long since a thing of the past. The life of the majority of new books that come out are measured in weeks or months. The fact that all of mine are still in print and still selling and being translated is something for which I am extremely grateful. 

The biggest growth area I see right now is small press indie publishers.  With print-on-demand and ebook formats so easy theses days, they can afford to get into the game and many of them are very good. Glimpses  wasn't sellable to my big publisher; it's too small and too niche. But I worked with 3 Crow press to produce it and it's selling well. Ten years ago I would have had to self publish, and that's hard to get into stores. 

JL - Do you feel the audience for the Nightrunner series has changed? What I mean is, I’m assuming your original audience was primarily a mainstream fantasy audience. There’s now a growing audience for specifically-m/m content. Do you think that audience is impacting what happens in mainstream fantasy? 

FL - Actually I think that market has been around for a long, long time. It's just come out into the open in the last fifteen years. One of the early manifestations was the Kirk/Spock Star Trek slashing. That goes back to the 70's, I think. But decades before I'd ever heard of slash or yaoi (after my first two books came out, actually) I was reading the works of Mary Renault and Anne Rice and liking the m/m parts very much. It wasn't sexual titillation, either. It was just neat and terribly romantic in their books. Renault was the making of me as a writer of gay characters. For one thing, her books mostly have happy endings. Men weren't destroyed for being gay, even in The Charioteer.  

Through the 70s and early 80s most if not all the queer characters I found in mainstream books and movies were either victims or villains, or were only hinted at. If they didn't die, they didn't get to have a real love, either. Buddies and side kicks? OK we'll allow that. But they never seemed to get center stage. I decided to attempt to create a dashing, roguish, heroic, noble gay hero who got to have a decent life and a lover. Their sexuality is not the point of the story. I just wanted to create a world where queer characters are accepted, lovable, and loved. 

That's a long answer, isn't it? The short one: I think that audience has always existed and now it's OK. More than OK, it's marketable. Sex sells, including m/m sex. I have a very mixed following: male/female, gay/straight, young/old—pretty much the gamut, except for homophobes, of course. They're scared off by the end of Stalking Darkness and write nasty reviews on Amazon, or directly to me. 

The biggest change I see in the mainstream market is how much more explicit the author can be. When I started the Nightrunner Series I was being bold for the mainstream. It's pretty tame now compared to newer works. A scholar recently referred to the series as "Homo-lite" in a journal article because I don't show explicit sex. I couldn't back in 1995, when Luck sold. You can now. It's almost expected, straight or gay. In books I mean. Well, also in . . . Never mind. 

JL - You put aside the Nightrunner series at one point. What drove that decision--and why did you decide to continue the series? (Which, may I say, I’m delighted you decided to do.) How many more adventures can we expect from Alec and Seregil? 

LF - Originally Luck in the Shadows and Stalking Darkness were one long, unsellable manuscript. I broke it in two, added a plot arc to Luck, and landed a two book deal. They did well enough that the publisher asked for more, so I wrote Traitor's Moon on another two book contract, but by the time I finished it I was tired—not of the characters, just mentally tired— and needed to do something else for awhile. Career-wise it might not have been the best idea, but at that point I just would have turned out crap, and I didn't want to do that to the boys. I didn't want to spoil the series, so I put it on hiatus. I filled out the contract with the first Tamír book, The Bone Doll's Twin, which was burning a hole in my brain, then the rest of the trilogy. To be honest, it was pretty scary going back to the Nightrunner world with Shadows Return for a number of reasons. First, I had to get back into that time period and detailed world. I had to get those characters talking in my head again. My biggest fear was whether there was any audience for more Nightrunner. As it happened, they were there waiting for me, and brought in new readers. I think I'm on my second generation of readers now. Shadows Return has done well, and the sequel, The White Road, went into a second printing within a few months of the first run and is going strong. 

JL - In Glimpses we finally see Seregil and Alec consummate their relationship. What are your thoughts about erotic content in fantasy novels? 

LF - If it's done well, I really like it. Sex is wonderful, when it's fun for everyone involved. It's a lovely part of life. But man, is it hard to write! For me at least. I had my stride from the earlier books, but my fans had been clamoring for more detail and I wanted to give it to them in the short story collection. Seregil and Alec's "first time" was the number one most requested scene for years, closely followed by what they got up to in that cabin in the woods in the missing years. I talked about it—heck, they did it all over the place— but I didn't show detailed scenes. Of course, some fan fiction was written, which I couldn't officially sanction because my publisher didn't like it and it was a big go around. So a few years ago I jokingly said on my blog that I should write my own fan fiction. They took me seriously and kept after me until I did. Glimpses ensued. I don't know about you, but writing a real sex scene makes me feel very naked. I'm not sure what I wrote qualifies as full bore erotica. But it's sex and was meant to be erotic and it fits with my world and the other books. It's romance, of course, loving acts between two people who feel some level of connection with each other. Sex for sex's sake is fine, too, and it's often alluded to in the series that Seregil had more than his share before he met Alec, and even for a while after. Maybe if there's a Glimpses II I'll write about that. 

JL - What makes for a satisfying fantasy novel in your opinion? 

LF - Characters I can care about and whose progress I feel invested in. Plot is important but if I don't care about the characters, I won't finish the book. I don't even have to like them, just find them interesting and need to know what happens to them next. I find your books addictive because you do that so well— make me care. The emotional arc you created through the Adrien (with an e) English books was just brilliant. 

JL - Thank you very much for those kind words. What advice do you have for newbie and aspiring fantasy writers? 

LF - I've said in other places, Don't worry if you're good enough. You're not—yet. You have to do the work, write the crap, find out how grueling it can be along with the joy of creation, find out how fragile your ego is, and keep going anyway, to get there. Becoming a successful writer? There's no trick, just a lot of devotion and hard work. 

JL - What’s on the horizon for Lynn Flewelling?  

LF - I'm pounding away at Casket of Souls for a February deadline, and then there's another Nightrunner book, which might be the last for a while, since I have some different projects beginning to take shape in my back brain. I'm signing Glimpses at Mysterious Galaxy bookstore in San Diego on October 16th and I'll be a guest at Yaoi Con in San Francisco at the end of October, but mostly I'm keeping my head down and working. And knitting. 

JL - Thanks very much to Lynn for taking the time to answer a few questions -- and here’s wishing her lots of success with Glimpses!


Comments

( 95 comments — Leave a comment )
jgraeme2007
Oct. 13th, 2010 03:04 pm (UTC)
First comment is mine
Just wanted to thank Lynn for agreeing to the interview, and for taking the time to answer in detail.

Also, I did try to get the covers of her books in here, but I can't figure out how Flicker operates now, so sorry for all that text and no purty pictures.
wedschilde
Oct. 13th, 2010 03:51 pm (UTC)
Re: First comment is mine
I am SO glad the two of you got to connect. Flickr is of the evil these days. You have to right mouse click, save image location and THEN copy that. It's a bear.

WOOOT! And I can't wait until your next book. If you can't make it down to San Diego sometime, we shall toast you at the lunch on Saturday. :::cheers:::

And thanks, Josh.
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heartofoshun
Oct. 13th, 2010 04:18 pm (UTC)
Great interview and interesting comments upon her work and the process of writing. I haven't read Lynn Flewelling yet. (I know I am hiding my face--I haven't read nearly as much fantasy as I should have given that I try to write it at times.) This interview definitely makes me want to go out and buy the books. Thanks for sharing!

Edited at 2010-10-13 04:19 pm (UTC)
jgraeme2007
Oct. 13th, 2010 04:41 pm (UTC)
I haven't read nearly as much fantasy as I should have given that I try to write it at times.)

I do most definitely recommend emmersing yourself in a genre you want to write in. Although love for a genre goes a long long way. The only thing that drives me nuts as a fan is when someone (usually attempting to write a mystery or crime novel) offers the info that they really don't read or care for mystery or crime novels -- and that they feel their work "transcends the genre."

This interview definitely makes me want to go out and buy the books. Thanks for sharing!


So glad you enjoyed it. I think you will really appreciate the Nightrunner books when you get around to them.
ataratah
Oct. 13th, 2010 04:30 pm (UTC)
Thanks to both of you so much for doing this interview. I can't think of anything you didn't cover, and it was wonderful to read about Lynn's approach to writing, and the way the market has changed over the years. Really, this was a great set of questions, with very insightful answers. I can't wait to check out Glimpses! ♥
jgraeme2007
Oct. 13th, 2010 04:37 pm (UTC)
Thanks to both of you so much for doing this interview. I can't think of anything you didn't cover, and it was wonderful to read about Lynn's approach to writing, and the way the market has changed over the years. Really, this was a great set of questions, with very insightful answers. I can't wait to check out Glimpses! ♥


Thanks for reading! I highly recommend Glimpses -- I honestly can't think of a nicer gift to one's devoted readers. The artwork alone is worth the price of admission. Truly great stuff.

I think Lynn is just a lovely, lovely person.

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jperceval
Oct. 13th, 2010 05:59 pm (UTC)
You had to go and dare me...
Ask me about cleaning up blood with a shovel or falling down in a truckload of dead cats and dogs. Go on, I dare you.

OK, maybe I don't really want to know! I did want to say I thoroughly enjoyed reading the interview! :-)
otterdance
Oct. 13th, 2010 06:16 pm (UTC)
Re: You had to go and dare me...
*g* Wise choice.
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greerwatson
Oct. 13th, 2010 06:38 pm (UTC)
Being a first-generation reader of the Nightrunner series (and very frustrated by the hiatus), I'm just so glad the second generation of books has started. If Glimpses has a different publisher, I don't know if it will make it into bookstores; but I do sometimes collect titles for an Amazon order around Christmas. I'm really looking forward to it!
jgraeme2007
Oct. 13th, 2010 08:22 pm (UTC)
Being a first-generation reader of the Nightrunner series (and very frustrated by the hiatus),

I think Lynn did pause in a good place, but it's a delight to see the story continue.
riverbella
Oct. 13th, 2010 06:38 pm (UTC)
What a delightful interview! I really enjoyed reading this as the questions were well-stated to invite Lynn to open up about her process and her relationship with writing, and the answers were so open and engaging.

I guess I am one of those second-generation fans. I "discovered" the Nightrunner books and Lynn about six months ago and then just devoured everything. I just finished "Glimpses" last night and absolutely loved the stories with their snapshots of significant moments in the life of characters I have come to love. (The artwork is really extraordinary as well.)

Thank you, Josh and Lynn, for a wonderful interview.
jgraeme2007
Oct. 13th, 2010 08:25 pm (UTC)
Thank you, Josh and Lynn, for a wonderful interview.

You're very welcome. So glad you enjoyed it!
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duelist_gurl163
Oct. 13th, 2010 06:47 pm (UTC)
Great interview! Thanks a lot for doing this, it's always fun to read more about one of my favorite authors. ^^ I aspire to be a published author someday and Lynn is definitely an inspiration to me.

With no new Nightrunner books to read until next year, I may have to check out your books next, Josh. ;)
jgraeme2007
Oct. 13th, 2010 08:26 pm (UTC)
I aspire to be a published author someday and Lynn is definitely an inspiration to me.

Excellent! Hopefully the interview will provide a little more inspiration.
saruby
Oct. 13th, 2010 07:00 pm (UTC)
Lovely interview.

Lynn, what contemporary genre authors do you recommend? I read a lot and I'm always looking for new stuff.
jgraeme2007
Oct. 13th, 2010 08:27 pm (UTC)
Lovely interview.

Glad you enjoyed it!
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seraphinawitch
Oct. 13th, 2010 07:09 pm (UTC)
Lyn Flewelling...emersing???
What a great interview, interesting questions, fascinating answers and it has achieved its object, I shall buy the ebook version of Glimpses pdq! Love to see that Lyn doesn't outline either, I am experimenting with this a bit, but not sure it will work for me, I think I almost have to be in a space where the characters tell me their stories and I find myself going in directions and to places I had never imagined.

I love her comments about writing sex scenes, Holly Lisle once commented that every time she writes one she can feel her mother staring over her shoulder in horror, saying 'how do you know about that?' I can't write a sex scene at my mother's home...oooooh no no no. Maybe I should swap stories with her about shovelling up blood, I worked in a chicken factory before I went off to university...squawking when they came in, frozen pieces when they went out and I worked in the messy bit...let's not go there!

I think you have invented a new word, emersing...e or ex, meaning out with mersing, something to do with water...does that mean you walk on water? - Yeah you do, you know you do - or is it what I shall do, plunging into electronic literature. ;D AM
otterdance
Oct. 13th, 2010 07:35 pm (UTC)
Re: Lyn Flewelling...emersing???
I do walk on water, as it happens, but plunging into water holding electronics is not a good idea, or so I'm told.


I hear you on chickens! We got the dead and dying from production farms on a regular basis and had to quickly find out what was wrong with them to prevent a full scale epidemic. Chickens STINK! Killing the sick ones with jumper cables was no fun.

Not sure which word you're referring to.
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(Anonymous)
Oct. 13th, 2010 08:34 pm (UTC)
Oh my gosh! I'm more behind than I thought. I came to the Nightrunner series late & I've only read the first three. (But isn't great to find a series that's well along?) I hesitated a bit before going on to Shadows Return as it sounded especially dark & I was concerned that Seregil & Alec might be separated for most of it. The reviews on Amazon are great tho so I'll get to it soon.

I'm looking forward to the illustrations in Glimpses; all the book covers have been lovely. Does it matter when I read Glimpses? Are there spoilers for things that happen in books 4-6?

Thank you both for the interview!

jackie
otterdance
Oct. 13th, 2010 09:25 pm (UTC)
If you've read Luck through Traitor's Moon, you're all set. :-)
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moth2fic
Oct. 13th, 2010 10:00 pm (UTC)
I'm so glad you two got together. This was a really informative interview - your questions drew so much of interest out of Lynn! I follow her LJ so I have bought glimpses (in ebook format) but haven't had a chance to read it yet. I got vaguely sidetracked by a certain Big Bang...

As a 'newbie and aspiring fantasy writer' I was particularly interested in the changes in the publishing world. My biggest problem - well, my biggest that I'm currently aware of(!) - is which publishers to approach. I was encouraged to learn that the smaller indie publishers are possibly the best bet.

It's wonderful hearing how writers I really like organise their work, their lives and their writing; it's even nicer that in the process they can be kind and helpful to those of us who would like to follow in their footsteps!

Thanks for a great interview with a great writer!

otterdance
Oct. 13th, 2010 10:33 pm (UTC)
*Waves to moth* :-) Both the big houses and the indie imprints have their advantages. I'm in the "get an agent" camp, but I don't know if that's as important with the indie imprints. Josh, do you have an agent?
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txilar
Oct. 13th, 2010 10:30 pm (UTC)
Great interview, thank you both for sharing.

I didn't even know about Glimpses, but as soon as I finished that paragraph I ordered it. Then I read the rest of the interview, knowing it was on its way. ^_^

And gosh that is a gorgeous cover. *mesmerised*
otterdance
Oct. 13th, 2010 10:53 pm (UTC)
Cover
The artist, Anne Cain, had me choose the models and so I got to look a a gazillion photos on a stock photo site she uses. And there were literally gazillions. I found the Alec model, and Reece, my editor, found the Seregil guy.
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thelastaerie
Oct. 13th, 2010 10:35 pm (UTC)
Thanks a lot for the interview, I really enjoyed reading it.

And I kept nodding when LF mentioned the change in gay characters in mainstream in the 70s and 80s. I thought AIDS has dominated everything about gay characters in the 80s, sometimes it's tough to read and also yeah, tend to victimize the gay characters (or turned them into villains), now I feel that the characters' possibility is endless. Fantasy is definitely a genre to reach the previous impossibilities.

otterdance
Oct. 14th, 2010 12:27 am (UTC)
SF and fantasy have been pushing the boundaries for decades. That's one of the things I really like about it. :-)
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merentha13
Oct. 13th, 2010 11:40 pm (UTC)
What a terrific surprise at the end of a truly awful day at work! My two most favorite authors, together! Thanks to both of you for doing this. I grabbed the Nightrunner books because of the cover of Shadow's Return (shallow, I know....) In checking out reviews for the series on line there were many recommendations for other books - namely the Adrien English series. So I got hooked on both together. I'm glad I didn't have to wait the many years between Traitor's Moon and Shadows Return. (I am not a patient person.) And Lynn, please keep on telling Josh how great it was to go back to old, familiar, well loved characters....we need more Adrien English! (Sorry Josh - I guess I must be starting to sound like the old broken record!) Can't wait until December when you two will do this again!
otterdance
Oct. 14th, 2010 12:30 am (UTC)
And Lynn, please keep on telling Josh how great it was to go back to old, familiar, well loved characters....we need more Adrien English! (Sorry Josh - I guess I must be starting to sound like the old broken record!)

Heh. Authors get that a lot. Did you ever read Stephen King's "Misery" or see the movie. Even though it's supposed to be horror, I as a writer laughed a lot reading it, and winced.
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jordan_c_price
Oct. 14th, 2010 01:13 am (UTC)
I remember how tickled I was to find a book with gay characters (your books!) in the 90's when I was binge-reading fantasy. I feel like I need to re-read from the beginning to be able to pick up the story after the hiatus. It's interesting to hear about why you needed to let the storyline rest. I totally agree with the difficulty of getting characters talking in your head when you've needed to work on other projects for a while--it's a challenge!
otterdance
Oct. 14th, 2010 04:42 am (UTC)
It certainly is. I had to "write my way back." And I think the boys were pissed that I'd left them hanging for nine years.
charliecochrane
Oct. 14th, 2010 08:53 am (UTC)
Wish I had a TARDIS to get over to the signing. Glimpses is top of my to buy list (never read a series of books in order and won't start now *g*).

I love the background for Seregil here. Bugs Bunny, oh yes indeed.

otterdance
Oct. 14th, 2010 02:23 pm (UTC)
Hi Charlie! Good to see you again. :-) Still waiting (im)patiently for more Jonty and Orlando! Hope you enjoy the books, in any order.
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liriel1810
Oct. 14th, 2010 09:48 am (UTC)
Very interesting interview. I haven't read the Nightrunner series, which is quite bizarre, considering that fantasy and sci-fi is my preferred genre for reading. I shall have to put them on my Christmas wish list.

I have a particular love of creating worlds, so it's always very interesting to read how another author creates their worlds.

Characters you really care about is absolutely essential, in any book. wishes really hard for more Adrien/Jake and also more Vic/Jacob from JCP

Thank you both for your time to ask and answer very interesting questions!
jgraeme2007
Oct. 14th, 2010 02:08 pm (UTC)
Very interesting interview. I haven't read the Nightrunner series, which is quite bizarre, considering that fantasy and sci-fi is my preferred genre for reading. I shall have to put them on my Christmas wish list.

You're in for a treat.

I have a particular love of creating worlds, so it's always very interesting to read how another author creates their worlds.

It's that balance of worlds and character inner life that's so hard to achieve. Lynn does it well.

Characters you really care about is absolutely essential, in any book. wishes really hard for more Adrien/Jake and also more Vic/Jacob from JCP

Never say never!

Thank you both for your time to ask and answer very interesting questions!

I'm glad you enjoyed it!
mongrelheart
Oct. 14th, 2010 06:04 pm (UTC)
Thanks for a great interview! I recently read Luck in the Shadows and just started on Stalking Darkness. Enjoying the story very much!
otterdance
Oct. 14th, 2010 09:59 pm (UTC)
Glad you're enjoying the journey! As soon as you've finished Stalking, you're set up for Glimpses!
:-)
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elena_62
Oct. 15th, 2010 09:47 pm (UTC)
A really interesting interview. Thank you both!

I particularly liked this: I jokingly said on my blog that I should write my own fan fiction. They took me seriously and kept after me until I did. Glimpses ensued.. An interesting premise ;-).

Ciao

Antonella
jgraeme2007
Oct. 16th, 2010 06:21 pm (UTC)
An interesting premise ;-).

It is. ;-D

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